Meeting Room opens at 1:45p today!

The room for our meetup with Bryan Alexander officially opens at 1:45p today (Tuesday, June 27). I will open the room even earlier if you’d like to test…due to limited time with Bryan, I want to start the discussion promptly at 2p!

Please check your email or the Slack announcement channel for the link to the Zoom room (the first time you connect to the room you will be prompted to download the software).

If you can’t attend but have a question you’d like to ask Bryan, let me know in a comment on this post or on Slack and I will do my best to work it in if we have time!

Two quick tech notes for Zoom:

1. if you haven’t used it before you will probably have some security prompts asking you to approve running Zoom.

2. I’ve set the meeting so that participants are automatically muted when they join the meeting. Feel free to enable your camera at any time, if you wish, but remember to unmute when you want to talk. And I really hope you all talk…listening to me talk with Bryan would probably be very boring for you!

Collection I Grades Are Posted

I’ve posted grades for Collection I in Blackboard. Please take a look at your grade (click through to the details to see what I based the score on) and let me know if I missed anything!

Note 1: If you disagree with my math, just let me know what I messed up on. Since some Nousioneers hate me and declined to make an “index” post for Collection I, so I had to do my best to figure out what activities belonged to the collection…I may have missed some or misinterpreted.

Note 1a: I may also have just messed something up!

Note 2: If you have no grade, that means you haven’t posted the work yet (that I can find), probably because you joined the class late. I’ll be watching for your Collection I “index” post telling me you’ve completed the collection activities.

Reminder: Connection & Commitment Means Comments

TL;DR: progressing through the course as if you are the only one will not only be less rich and interesting, but it won’t raise your grade above average either. For that you will want to comment, collaborate, interact, engage, question, etc.

While there are other ways to make connections and show commitment, some of which will be engaged as part of Collections III and IV, the primary method is through engaging with your peers. And the most straightforward way to do this is through commenting on their blog and wiki entries. This, of course, also means you need to pay attention to—and respond to—your peers when they engage with your own work!

Here, I have highlighted all the comments made by current Nousionauts (excluding myself, fncll) on wiki pages other than their own:

That’s not a mistake…there aren’t any!

Here is a view in my feed reader in which I’ve highlighted recent comments made by Nousionauts (again, other than myself) for this course over the past week:

A little thin!

There’s no single view of the Nousion group hypothes.is stream that shows this information directly, but it’s fairly easy to see that while some people are annotating the web literacy book, most are not responding to anything that others have said (yet).

I certainly recognize that many students are proceeding at different paces, and the first few to complete an activity don’t have as much to potentially respond to. But there is a lot of great work being done out there now…and not all of it can possibly be perfect and fully complete!

Viewing and Following Class Annotations in Hypothes.is

Just a note as you are annotating and commenting using hypothes.is: one of the reasons I am using a class group is to make it easier to follow your classmates’ comments!

As you each add your annotations to Mike’s book, if you choose the Nousion group for your annotations, they will appear in the stream of comments on the hypothes.is group page:

You can click any of the user’s names on the right to drill down into their particular annotations (and use the “Visit Annotations in Context” link to see the comments on that page…where you can respond). For example, here I have drilled down into just Bob’s comments:

Scheduling a Meetup Next Week with Bryan Alexander

Please check your email for an invitation/poll for our meetup with Bryan Alexander next week and respond by Friday. Also, please submit the poll even if your availability is extremely limited or nil…that way I know you received the invitation! This is a great opportunity to have a conversation about digital citizenship, web literacy, fake news, technology and education with an internationally renowned speaker, futurist, consultant and researcher.

I will endeavor to record the session, but given Google’s flakiness with hangouts and recordings lately, I’m making no guarantees!

Public Annotation and Private Pages

Just a reminder as you explore, reflect and annotate with hypothes.is: while you can technically annotate many password-protected and customizable pages, those annotations might not be accessible to others and they will likely be less than useful without the context to which they are attached.

For example, an intrepid Nousioneer attempted to use hypothes.is on Doug Belshaw’s book by commenting on the GumRoad (the book’s distributor) site. From her perspective, while logged in, the annotations might have context but for the rest of us—even if we login—the annotations are attached to an empty page!

That’s one of the reasons I didn’t assign hypothes.is when reading Doug’s book and something to keep in mind when you are choosing which tool(s) to use when engaging with an online (or kind of online) text. Kudos to Carolyn for jumping in and using hypothes.is though!

Nousion Blogs for Your Feed Reader

UPDATED: 6/21/17 with the last student site. You can re-import the file in your reader.

If you use a feed reader like Feedly (powerful and user-friendly) or Inoreader (super powerful, recommended for information junkies), here is an OPML file you can use to import all class blogs (including comments) at once: nousion-17-all-sites (right-click and save file).

To use the OPML file with Feedly, click on Organize Sources in the sidebar and scroll to the bottom of the page where you will find an Import Opml… link. Use this link to import the file you just saved.

To use the OPML file with Inoreader, click on the Gear icon to access your Preferences, look for the Import/Export section and use the Import button to import the file you just saved (you might want to create a folder to put them all in).

If you aren’t yet a user of a feed reader, you might find it useful not just for this class, but for keeping up with news and information sources of all kinds. Setting yourself up with a feed reader and using it can also count as part of your activities for an upcoming collection. The beauty of the feed reader is that it creates something much like an email inbox with all posts and comments in one place for readings, browsing to comment, etc., keeping track of what you’ve read (and left unread)—and what is new—as you go. This saves a TON of time over constantly browsing to individual sites to see what is new.

For example, this is one of my Inoreader views of all the unread items in class blogs and comments:

(more…)

The Answer Is Yes

The answer is: yes.

A Nousionaut asked me today if she could, for one of her reflections, “have a discussion on Slack about the chapter and then post a screen shot to our blog?” My response: yes! Even better, I noted, she could create a channel in Slack and have a conversation there…then no screenshots are necessary and anyone who wants to could join in. Yes, a thousand times yes.

I try to leave as many assignments open-ended as possible for just this reason: you can do it your own way! If nothing else, the sheer tedium of writing so many reflections the same way should drive you to trying out alternatives.

 

Can some of your reflections exist solely as comments/additions to the wiki reflections of your fellow voyagers? Yes. Can some of your reflections be simply comments on other Nousioneers’ blog pages? Yes. Can you record a conversation on Skype or Zoom with a class compatriot (or two, or three) and count that? Yes.

Side note: I refuse to force you to treat this course as something other than independent study…forcing you to engage/collaborate/debate with your peers feels forced and fraudulent…but I think the class is more fun if you do and I recognize such interactions both in terms of Connection and Commitment points as well as freedom to, as our greatest monarch, the Burger King observed, have it your way.